FAQ’s

Q: What can I expect during my initial physiotherapy session?

Your physiotherapist will ask you a series of questions about your injury or condition, and then conduct a thorough exam. This exam is likely to include some gentle diagnostic tests of your strength and flexibility. We will discuss a treatment plan with you. Time permitting, we’ll dive right into treatment. Treatment may include remedial massage (soft tissue and joint release work), stretching, and exercises.

Q: Do I need a referral to see a physiotherapist?

You do not need a referral to see our physiotherapists. In some circumstances (such as workers comp, veteran affairs, Medicare, or motor vehicle accident) you may need a referral in order to claim the cost of your treatment.

 

Q: Do you have a waiting list for physiotherapy appointments?

We are usually able to see you within the week.

 

Q: What is your cancellation policy?

All sessions that are cancelled with less than 24 hours notice are billed at the full rate.

 

Q: How many physiotherapy sessions will it take for me to recover from my injury?

Each recovery process is different, depending on the nature of the injury and your overall state of health. Speaking very generally, conditions that have developed or persisted over a long period of time will take a relatively long time to resolve. For example, if you have had low back pain for a year, you can expect that your recovery will be measured in months of physiotherapy rather than weeks. As a general rule of thumb, grade 2 sports injuries heal within two to eight weeks, depending on the severity of the injury. Please talk to your physiotherapist to get a better idea about the recovery time for your specific condition.

 

Q: Can I submit a claim to my health fund on the spot?

If your health fund participates in the HICAPS system, you can claim on the spot directly through HICAPS and only pay the gap. Please bring your swipable health fund card with you to your appointment. To check whether your health fund participates in HICAPS, please visit the HICAPS website at http://www.hicaps.com.au/ or check with your fund directly.

 

Q: How can Pilates help me?

Pilates allows you to change the way you move. Pilates aims to create efficient and effective movement by working to strengthen and lengthen muscles and improve neuromuscular patterning. Moving efficiently and effectively will help prevent injuries and allow you to optimize your performance in sports, dance, and daily activities. In addition, Pilates can be helpful in rehabilitating injuries and can play a role in managing certain diseases, such as diabetes.

 

Q: What is the difference between Studio, Mat and Allegro classes?

In a studio class, an instructor works with a maximum of three clients. Each client is given his or her own program, with the instructor teaching an exercise to one client and then moving on to the next while the first client completes the repetitions of the exercise. Mat classes are group classes, with all students in the group performing the same series of exercises together. Allegro classes are group classes using the Reformer equipment.

 

Q: What sort of muscle soreness can I expect after my first few Pilates sessions?

Pilates exercises target muscles close to your core. Depending on your exercise history, you may not have worked these deep muscles for quite some time – or ever! Muscles that haven’t moved for a while often react to exercise with some stiffness and soreness. This kind of soreness, called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS), is common any time you begin a new exercise program. DOMS usually peaks two days after the new exercise, and typically subsides in a couple of days. If  soreness lasts longer than a few days, please check in with your instructor or physiotherapist.

 

Q: Why do I need an initial consultation in beginning a Pilates program?

An initial consultation is important to assess your physical condition and allow us to understand your goals and needs. The initial consultation also gives you the individual attention needed to learn to correctly engage the muscles targeted in Pilates, such as the deep stability muscles.

 

Q: What should I know about good studio etiquette?

Please turn off your mobile phone before entering the studio. For your own comfort and safety, it’s a good idea to remove any chunky jewelry and dangly earrings. To be considerate of other students, please avoid excessive moisturizer, perfume, or hairspray. For your own comfort and that of other students, please avoid wearing very short shorts, or other clothing that could leave you feeling overexposed as you perform a variety of exercises on the Pilates equipment.

 

Q: Can I use my Health Insurance to claim my Pilates sessions?

If your health cover includes physiotherapy, then it will cover Pilates sessions with a physiotherapist. Depending on the type of health insurance you have, it may cover non-physiotherapist classes.

 

Q: How often should I attend classes?

Once a week is good; two to three times a week is optimal.

 

Q: Which is more effective, group or studio classes?

It depends on what you would like to get out of your Pilates classes. Studio classes provide individual attention and are tailored to your specific needs and goals. The mat and Allegro classes give you a full body workout focusing on core stability and spinal movement.

 

Q: Do I need an initial consultation to join a mat class?

Not necessarily, although it is helpful to come in 15 minutes earlier than your class time, to fill out a client form with your goals, past history of any injury and to have a chat to your Instructor about the basics of pilates.

 

Q: What is the difference between doing Pilates with a Pilates instructor and with a Physiotherapist?

Physiotherapists have a detailed understanding of anatomy, physiology, and different pathologies. They use the Pilates repertoire, along with other tools and techniques, to help you achieve your goals in rehabilitating injuries. Pilates instructors are well suited to helping generally healthy clients achieve their health and fitness goals. In our studio, we take a team approach, with physiotherapists and Pilates instructors working together to help our clients achieve their individual goals.

 

Q: What is the difference between Pilates and yoga?

Pilates and yoga both stress the connection between mind and body, and are complementary forms of work. Properly taught classical yoga is as much concerned with spiritual health as physical health. Many forms of yoga instruction emphasize holding a static posture, often as a way to clear the mind for meditation. Pilates, on the other hand, emphasizes movement. Modern Pilates has been heavily influenced by physiotherapy and ongoing research in anatomy and physiology.

 

Q: What can I expect during my initial physiotherapy session?

Your physiotherapist will ask you a series of questions about your injury or condition, and will then conduct a thorough exam. This exam is likely to include some gentle diagnostic tests of your strength and flexibility. We will discuss a treatment plan with you. Time permitting, we’ll dive right into treatment. Treatment may include remedial massage (soft tissue and joint release work), stretching, and exercises.

 

Q: Do I need a referral to see a physiotherapist?

You do not need a referral to see our physiotherapists. In some circumstances (such as workers comp, veteran affairs, Medicare, or motor vehicle accident) you may need a referral in order to claim the cost of your treatment.

 

Q: Do you have a waiting list for physiotherapy appointments?

We are usually able to see you within the week

 

Q: What is your cancellation policy?

All sessions that are cancelled with less than 24 hours notice are billed at the full rate.

 

Q: How many physiotherapy sessions will it take for me to recover from my injury?

Each recovery process is different, depending on the nature of the injury and on your overall state of health. Speaking very generally, conditions that have developed or persisted over a long period of time will take a relatively long time to resolve. For example, if you have had low back pain for a year, you can expect that your recovery will be measured in months of physiotherapy rather than weeks. As a general rule of thumb, grade 2 sports injuries heal within two to eight weeks, depending on the severity of the injury. Please talk to your physiotherapist to get a better idea about the recovery time for your specific condition.

 

Q: Can I submit a claim to my health fund on the spot?

If your health fund participates in the HICAPS system, you can claim on the spot directly through HICAPS and only pay the gap. Please bring your swipable health fund card with you to your appointment. To check whether your health fund participates in HICAPS, please visit the HICAPS website at http://www.hicaps.com.au/ or check with your fund directly.

 

Q: How can Pilates help me?

Pilates allows you to change the way you move. Pilates aims to create efficient and effective movement by working to strengthen and lengthen muscles and improve neuromuscular patterning. Moving efficiently and effectively will help prevent injuries and allow you to optimize your performance in sports, dance, and daily activities. In addition, Pilates can be helpful in rehabilitating injuries and can play a role in managing certain diseases, such as diabetes.

 

Q: What is the difference between studio, mat, and Allegro classes?

In a studio class, an instructor works with a maximum of three students. Each student is given his or her own program, with the instructor teaching an exercise to one student and then moving on to the next while the first student completes the repetitions of the exercise. Mat classes are group classes, with all students in the group performing the same series of exercises together. Allegro classes are group classes using the Reformer equipment.

 

Q: What sort of muscle soreness can I expect after my first few Pilates sessions?

Pilates exercises target muscles close to your core. Depending on your exercise history, you may not have worked these deep muscles for quite some time – or ever! Muscles that haven’t moved for a while often react to exercise with some stiffness and soreness. This kind of soreness, called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS), is common any time you begin a new exercise program. DOMS usually peaks two days after the new exercise, and typically subsides in a couple of days. If the soreness lasts longer than a few days, please check in with your instructor or physiotherapist

 

Q: Why do I need an initial consultation in beginning a Pilates program?

An initial consultation is important to assess your physical condition and allow us to understand your goals and needs. The initial consultation also gives you the individual attention needed to learn to correctly engage the muscles targeted in Pilates, such as the deep stability muscles.

 

Q: What should I know about good studio etiquette?

Please turn off your mobile phone before entering the studio. For your own comfort and safety, it’s a good idea to remove any chunky jewelry and dangly earrings. To be considerate of other students, please avoid excessive moisturizer, perfume, or hairspray. For your own comfort and that of other students, please avoid wearing very short shorts, or other clothing that could leave you feeling overexposed as you perform a variety of exercises on the Pilates equipment.

 

Q: Can I use my Health Insurance to claim my Pilates sessions?

If your health cover includes physiotherapy, then it will cover Pilates sessions with a physiotherapist. Depending on the type of health insurance you have, it may cover non-physiotherapist classes.

 

Q: How often should I attend classes?

Once a week is good; two to three times a week is optimal.It depends on what you would like to get out of your Pilates classes. Studio classes provide individual attention and are tailored to your specific needs and goals. The mat and Allegro classes give you a full body workout focusing on core stability and spinal movement.

 

Q: Do I need an initial consultation to join a mat class?

An initial consultation is recommended before starting mat classes, in order to learn correct activation of the core stability muscles, but is not required.

 

Q: What is the difference between doing Pilates with a Pilates instructor and with a Physiotherapist?

Physiotherapists have a detailed understanding of anatomy, physiology, and different pathologies. They use the Pilates repertoire, along with other tools and techniques, to help you achieve your goals in rehabilitating injuries. Pilates instructors are well suited to helping generally healthy clients achieve their health and fitness goals. In our studio, we take a team approach, with physiotherapists and Pilates instructors working together to help our clients achieve their individual goals.

 

Q: What is the difference between Pilates and yoga?

Pilates and yoga both stress the connection between mind and body, and are complementary forms of work. Properly taught classical yoga is as much concerned with spiritual health as physical health. Many forms of yoga instruction emphasize holding a static posture, often as a way to clear the mind for meditation. Pilates, on the other hand, emphasizes movement. Modern Pilates has been heavily influenced by physiotherapy and ongoing research in anatomy and physiology.